Charlotte's Journey Home

Just a Regular Kid, Sort Of

Do You Know the Correlation Between CHD and Brain Injuries? (#CHDAware)

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While Charlotte was in hospital last February, one of her PICU nurses, Carrie Alden, from 2005 stopped by. Carrie had recently returned to Lurie Children’s cardiology department from an outside position and when she saw Charlotte’s name on the CCU in-patient list she had to stop by. Of course she wanted to see her favorite patient, but she also wanted us to meet Dr. Bradley Marino, a pioneer in the subfield of cardiac neurodevelopmental outcomes.

He was clearly surprised and delighted that Charlotte attends, and excels at, a bilingual school. Chills ran down my spine when he explained: It seems that children with CHD suffer “neurodevelopmental and psychosocial impairments due to brain injuries related to their congenital heart defects.” These brain injuries don’t come from catastrophic incidents (this is not an episode of Code Black, it’s a “mommy blog”); they come from low oxygen levels and poor brain blood flow, as well as issues related to medical and surgical treatments.

Charlotte’s oxygen levels have always been above 90%, usually above 95% and most typically between 96-98%. We knew this was good because the nurses and doctors were always happy about it. And since they were happy, we never thought to ask why they were happy or what the problem with a low sat level might be.

Here’s what we didn’t know:

75 percent of these patients are at risk for language impairment, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, executive dysfunction, visual processing issues, fine and gross motor problems and behavioral and emotional difficulties. More than 30 percent of these children require remedial services in school including tutoring, special education, and physical, occupational and speech therapies.

Sometimes ignorance really is bliss, I guess. Had I known, I would have worried. Instead, we followed the advice of a friend who had a friend with super-premies and had Charlotte assessed when she was 7 or 8 weeks old, immediately getting her into PT and feeding therapy. We panicked when a teacher (incorrectly) thought Charlotte had developmental or behavioral issues and sought a full battery of neuropsych, OT and developmental assessments. And then we followed the advice of the neuropsychologist and had her assessed again in third grade.

Turns out she has minor visual processing issues (that she seems to be outgrowing) and some fine motor challenges.

If Charlotte had had serious problems, we’d have been on top of them. But not because our cardiologist (who we adore), our surgeon (ditto), or any medical staff (again, ditto), suggested we do these tests and interventions. Because we followed the advice of another mom (it was well-reasoned and cost me nothing to follow), and the intuition (if flawed) of a master teacher.

That said, I’m am beyond grateful to the universe from sparing Charlotte further challenges related to her broken heart. And I’m beyond thrilled that Dr. Marino is heading the new (as of 2015) Neo-Heart Developmental Support Program at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. I urge you to read about his great work, and a lovely patient he has helped, here. (All the quotes in this post come from this article.)

No CHD parent can say it enough: As more and more of our children live longer lives (my cousin is in her 50s), we need to make sure that they lead the fullest lives possible. The answer, as always, is research and outreach.

We are #CHDAware.

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Author: Culture Bean

I am a mother, a pre-published children's author, and a published academic. I am also a "mommy blogger," though I hate the term. My passions are reading and writing. As a professor, I strive to help my students think critically about the media and culture with which they engage. I've started this blog because it's time I put my money where my mouth is!

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